2013-04-30

Life in Eve: You Play How You Practice - Putting the Play into Practice (4/4)

Whew.

Okay, let's see if we can pull all this musing into some kind of coherent plan for missions. There's a lot here, so let's boil it down.

Here are the parts of the topic already covered:

  • Part 1 and Part 2 talked about the fundamentals of PvP in Eve (as broken down by Ripard Teg), and how those could be applied to new missions.

  • Part 2.5 answered some questions that parts 1 and 2 generated.

  • Part 3 talked about the ways Ripard's "stages of PvP" could map to "stages of a mission."


From that, I want to boil down some of the rules and guidelines for making new missions based on the precepts of Eve PvP.

  1. Current PvE missions are kind of terrible. Outside of the UI, it is in PvE mission content that Eve truly shows its age: dated, primitive, simplistic, and boring.

  2. Aside from being boring, all but a few of the missions teach piloting behavior at direct odds to every other part of the game. Yes, running missions will teach you how to interact with Eve's UI, but in all other respects missions actively train that player in ways that makes them demonstrably and steadily worse at every other kind of play in the game, including:


    • Poor ship selection. (Bigger is better! Battleships beat everything! Gear determines success!)

    • Poor ship fitting choices. (Cap rechargers! Propulsion modules are pointless! What's a Warp Scrambler?)

    • Poor target selection/situational awareness. (Shoot the battleship first: it's got the biggest bounty. What do these icons over my HUD mean? Nevermind, don't care!)

    • Poor threat assessment. (There's only fifty of them and one of me. No problem!)

    • Poor or non-existent manual piloting skills, let alone an understanding of transveral and/or signature/speed tanking. (I'll just approach the next acceleration gate and slowboat that way as I kill everything.)


  3. I'm not talking about missions getting harder, unless by "harder" you mean "requiring some preparation and thought."

  4. I'm not talking about replacing all the old missions, because the old missions form a backbone of salvage that the market needs. That said, those missions where you're fighting 50 on 1 should CLEARLY MENTION that you're not fighting a credible threat like capsuleers, and mention this OFTEN.


    • Corollary to this: mission agents should be dismissive of the threat of normal fleets to a capsuleer, and if anything overreact to the possible threat from even a small group of 'capsuleer' NPCs in a mission.


  5. Higher level missions do not automatically (or even often) equate to 'you need a bigger ship'.


  6. The level of the mission should determine how much "ship fitting" hand-holding the player gets beforehand.



    • Level 1 and any Training missions: “Okay, this is the situation, in Detail. Because of those Details, that means you need a ship that can do X, Y, and Z. So: get a ship of [this class] and [this role], which includes ships like the [names here], and make sure that it has [this module], [this module], and [this module]. If you don’t have that stuff, you’re going to have a bad time.”

    • Level 2 missions: ”This is the situation, in Detail. You will need to do [These Things], which probably means [this general ship class] with appropriate modules to perform [X, Y, Z]. I leave it up to you to make sure you can perform as needed.

    • Level 3 missions: “This is the situation, pretty much. This is what you have to be able to do. Handle it.”

    • Level 4 missions: ”This is what little intel we have. Further instructions once you arrive and can give us eyes on the site. Good luck. We trust you.”




Important:  This is about bringing the skillset of the PvE pilot closer to skillset of the PvP pilot, so that acclimation from one mode of play to another is easier and, thus, more likely to see crossover.

This is not about moving higher level missions to low- or null-sec. Doing that won't 'force' anyone in the game anywhere, except "out of the game." It's a GAME, people will play how they want, and if you try to force them, you're just hurting the game.

Now, with all that TL;DR summary in place, let's talk some specifics.

1. It's Not the Size of the Ship...


Different ships fit different roles. Each class of ship has areas were they excel, and others where they are weaker. Bring only one type of ship to a fight, and you are that much more likely to encounter a "hard counter" that will annihilate you.

Missions should drive home an understanding of the strengths of various ship classes.

FF (Frigates): Excellent Tackle. Excellent Scout. Decent bait, provided support is nearby. Moderate to Good EWAR platform. Not-bad support option, in some situations. Reasonably good damage mitigation versus larger ships, thanks to high speed, but otherwise comparatively fragile. Comparatively poor damage.

DD (Destroyers): Serviceable tackle, if nothing else if available. Serviceable Scout, if nothing better is available. Decent bait, provided support is nearby.Generally poor EWAR platform. All but non-existent support capability. Moderate to poor damage mitigation (tank can be matched by some frigates, too slow to speed tank very well.) Comparatively OUTSTANDING damage: Excellent versus frigates or other destroyers. Excellent cost-to-damage option versus larger targets.

CC (Cruisers): Generally poor tackle versus smaller targets, good "heavy" tackle versus bigger targets. Not recommended for scouting, but often decent bait. Potentially excellent EWAR platform. Potentially excellent support capability. Good to great damage mitigation. Good to great damage (though you probably won't get that AND good mitigation). Great all-around ship versus moderate resistance, and can tweak fittings to deal with many different types of ships. Best versatility for cost.

BC (Battlecruisers): Generally as a cruiser, but more so. Exceptions: poor EWAR or support except in gimmick small-gang fits. Even more flexible options in terms of modules makes it potentially more versatile than a Cruiser (giving up less to get what it needs) at higher cost that may or may not be worth it.

BB (Battleships): Poor tackle. Terrible scout. Obvious bait. Rarely used as ewar, except on dedicated ships. Support options are often somewhat gimmick fits. Great damage mitigation. Great damage (and can easily do both at once, by comparison to smaller ships), though applying damage to any smaller targets may require specific modules (webs, scramblers, target painters, et cetera).

One of the main reasons to make sure missions continue to ask for all classes of ship, regardless of mission level: it helps players understand that no class of ship ever becomes 'useless', regardless of the level of play you reach.

2. Your Role in this Mission, Should You Accept It...


Damage: We have a lot of missions like this already, and if any more are added, they should be against "capsuleer"- grade opponents, to teach pilots to access threats in way that more closely represents every other part of the game: one-tenth the number of ships for the same amount of overall threat.

1v1: Get capsuleers challenged to 1v1 "duels" versus NPC capsuleer opponents (or arrange for them to "challenge" an NPC via the agent). This can be balanced by level of mission, with ship restrictions to ensure the player doesn't steamroll. Even better: don't worry about the ship restrictions, and just have the NPC warp out if you show up in an inappropriate level of ship or bring backup. Have this sort of thing cause the failure of the mission, since the point is to get the guy to fight, pin him down, and kill him, whereas scaring him off will "set our pursuit back by months, if not years." HOWEVER: if you can get a scram on the guy and THEN bring in backup, that should work. It does in the rest of the game. Honor-shmonor.


I'm not going to do more of these, because most of them show up in some other area: Damage dealing is requisite.


Wait, one more consideration: Range. Some missions should specifically call for sniper fits, mid-range fits, or brawler fits, and what the means should be different for different classes of ships.




Long range artillery: Awesome, though maybe not THIS awesome.


Tackle: Oh what fun we can have here.

First guy through the accel gate. Sort of like 'cheating' at the 1v1 above. The idea is to go in on an otherwise superior opponent and get a tackle, holding it until your (NPC) backup arrives. Higher level missions provide the NPC target with webs, neuts, scrams, smartbombs, backup of his own, and may mean the backup takes longer to arrive.


"I was there."


Speaking of giving your NPC forces a chance to warp in, why the hell don't we have a mission like this?



That would be cool.


“There are pilots camping our station in snipe battlecruisers.” - I'd love to see a way to do this right in high-sec, right on the station where the Agent is at. "Enemy" NPCs show up outside the station. You need to get tackle on them so NPC support can come in and finish them off. Instant-undocks can make getting away from the fire of the ship much easier (maybe an earlier mission walks the player through making one for a 'scouting/lookout' mission). Get tackle and let the NPCs mop up. All NPCs involved would be impossible for others to shoot without being CONCORDed, to prevent mission griefing.


In-mission variation: The mission is in a non-gated deadspace pocket, and the pilot is encouraged to warp in at range to land on top of the offending ship. Those that don't do that get a quick lesson in how to spiral approach. :)

In fact, seeing the way in which the UI can be affected by the new scanner overlay coming out soon, I have NO DOUBT that a 'how to spiral approach' tutorial missions could be built, with blinky box overlays on the HUD to show where to manually pilot in order to keep from getting splatted by a distant sniper.

Catch that guy before he gets out of range! Basically, get scram/web tackle before the NPC leaves. The best idea here is if you have a mission where the enemy have set up a Stargate (See: "Halt the Invasion") and the enemy ships appear through the stargate and land in your trap. If you get both scram/web, the target dies. If you get only one, he might make it out. If you get neither, he's gone, and you fail.


EWAR/Support: Sometimes damage isn't the point. In this situation, you're asked to come in as support for an NPC gang or even a solo pilot. Specific types of EWAR will probably be called for, and the reasons for the need given:

  • "We need target painters to get a bead on those little bastards."

  • "We need tracking disruptors so we can get under the guns of those big bastards."

  • "We need energy neutralizers to break the enemy's self-repair capability."

  • "We need ECM so the enemy rages in local and leaves."


Support modules (repairs, etc) are called for in something like one training mission to sort of 'resurrect' a damaged ship. It's terrible. Missions for logi/support pilots should exist, and thanks to the new support frigates and tech1 cruisers, can start right away. The job is simple: wait for the NPC to shout for help, get in there and keep him standing. Alternately, warp into an ongoing battle and try to turn the tide of the fight with your amazing rep skills.



Medic!



Scouting/Bait

Setting up the conditions of the fight to be favorable to your side -- a great player skill to train. This is an excellent opportunity to build missions around flying around a system “Looking like bait.”  Try to get the NPC enemies to engage you by looking helpless and alone, then tackle them when they show up and your backup jumps in. Level 1 versions of this mission might lead you by the nose, so you get an idea of what's needed (“Warp to Planet 1 at 100. Now Align to the Sun. Warp to the Sun at 0. Now warp to the Asteroid belt on Planet 1 at 50. Now the Acceleration gate and jump through. Hold there. Here they come!”), while higher level missions merely tell you “Get their attention and lure them into the complex before you call us in.”

"Clearly, I am a harmless loon. Come fight me!"


Non-bait scouting might be more of a tutorial, and teach the player to use d-scan on 360 max range, narrow beam long range. 360 short, and so on.

"Does anyone have a cyno ship handy?”

Combine any of the tackle/bait ideas with a "prototype (nee: civilian) cynosural field generator" and have the player call in their backup with a full-blown cyno. (No beacon in local, and 'works' in high-sec -- hence "prototype".)  This is a mission -- one of the few -- that should send the player to nearby space held by the enemy faction. Some missions might be a "bait, get them to attack, then light the fire and hope you live" situation, while others would be more of a 'sneak our forces in behind enemy lines" scenario which, if done correctly, would result in no combat all. "Tiptoe in, tiptoe out. Like a cat, one might say." Obviously, as with the rest of the game, any size ship might be appropriate for a cyno job, depending on the type of mission.

There is, not for nothing, an excellent opportunity here to tie this kind of mission into the lore of everything that's happening in New Eden right now. Tensions between the empires are rising, and these sorts of behind the scenes sneak attacks would be great to get into the game.

Would it be cool to be able to call Hot Drop O'clock on an enemy force you tricked into engaging? Sure.

You know what else would be cool?

What if you take a mission from the Minmatar, and they want you to sneaky-cyno a fleet of their ships into Gallente space? No combat, of course -- it's all just 'training maneuvers' -- completely legitimate. Still, probably better not to ask any questions, though you might be able to guess their reasons.

So...


All classes of ships used, in all levels of missions.

Jobs to perform that mirror the roles you play in PvP, and the play priorities.

Sometimes, the need to run after you win. Sometimes that means having missions where you kill a specific target and get out, and sometimes it means MANY missions should have stupidly overwhelming backup arrive on the field about a few minutes after the last NPC dies. Angry backup.

No real changes to the current missions. (Except making sure players understand that non-capsuleers are NOT in the same classes as the pilots "like you"... and making low-sec mission rewards actually provide rewards comparable to the risk/cost of living in lowsec, so they're worth it.)

Fitting priorities and expectations more in line with every other part of the game. Basically, short and brutal fights where mobility, buffer, and burst tanks far outweigh the importance of cap stability, and tackle modules actually AFFECT THE NPCS. (I'm looking at you, Faction Warfare destroyers that fly 5500 meters/second while scrammed. So stupid.)

What do you guys think?
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